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Road Trip Home From Fort Bragg

According to Google, the drive home from Fort Bragg, Calif. should take ten hours. We did it in fourteen. Clearly, we didn’t follow Google’s plan. Instead, we stopped (or drove) anywhere something looked interesting — and took pictures.

  • A few roadside turnouts along the Pacific.1 The coast is so beautiful! We had to stop multiple times to take it in.
  • Drive-Thru Tree Park in Leggett. Six years ago, we had another Mendocino weekend and stopped here on the way home to take pictures. Traditions are hard to break.2
  • Humboldt Redwoods State Park. Kevin hadn’t seen redwoods before, so we had had our excuse to stop and take pictures. And hug trees. And sit on logs. And take more pictures.
  • Avenue of the Giants. Stopping in the park wasn’t enough redwoods so we drove through miles of those gorgeous, big trees. Amazing! And we stopped some more.
  • Paul’s Live From New York Pizza in Eureka. Mmm… How did we know where to eat before smartphones with maps and Yelp?3
  • False Klamath Cove just south of Wilson Creek and Crescent City. At six in the evening and still in California, we should have kept driving, but we were ready for a break.4 We knew there was going to be enough driving in the dark of the night that we might as well enjoy a little more beach. Kevin and I threw sticks and logs into the ocean while Suzi and Ashley wrote on the sand. It was well worth the stop!

And that doesn’t count filling the car a couple of times.5


  1. I think one was in the windy twisties. Those in the back seat (and maybe in the front) needed a break. 
  2. And why would you? 
  3. Yeah, that’s right. We used to just eat at Taco Bell… 
  4. And not yet halfway home… 
  5. And ourselves with coffee. Mmm… 
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Mendocino Weekend

This past weekend, my brothers and I1 trekked to Mendocino, California. Brother Don arranged2 to have the lagoon at PUC’s Albion Biological Field Station named in honor of our parents. Nicely done!

We enjoyed seeing family and friends and seeing a part of California we used to visit twice yearly for camping trips.3

Here are a few of the pictures from the weekend.


  1. And a bunch of other people. 
  2. Yeah, I am the master of understatement. 
  3. Now I have the urge to ride the Skunk train, roll down sand dunes, and watch axes thrown at logs. I do not miss the yearly case of poison oak. ;-) 
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Kayaking With Mousse On Sunset Lake

For our Saturday excursion, Suzi and I rented1 four kayaks to explore Sunset Lake. Ashley got a larger life vest for Mousse.2

Suzi, Ashley, Heather, and I boarded our kayaks. Ashley had Mousse join her. Things went swimmingly until Mousse went swimming. Thanks to Mousse’s life vest and its handle, Ashley was able to get Mousse back on board. Turns out, Mousse likes to swim and is fast. And Mousse likes to swim a lot! With her life vest, we didn’t worry about Mousse getting dog tired. We could paddle next to her and let her dog paddle.

Another fun day on the water.3 :-)


  1. By the way, if you are looking for a nice place to rent some recreational kayaks around Seaside, Cleanline treated us well. I’m sure they’d do the same for you. The owner is friendly. That wasn’t too surprising. The kids who helped put the kayaks on my car were friendly, too, introducing themselves, shaking my hand, asking how my visit was, etc. Wow! 
  2. Although we also got one for Meisa, it’s going back; Meisa said nothing doing to putting on a life vest so she could sit on a tippy kayak. Instead Meisa relaxed, tied up at our campsite. 
  3. Yeah, that’s redundant. ;-) 
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Sunset at Sunset Beach

sunset

Suzi and I preceded the kids by a day on our Fourth of July camping trip. This is likely the first time Suzi and I have camped without the kids since Ashley appeared on the scene. Wow!

We had decided late in the game that we were going to go camping this weekend. There were no reservations available so we thought we’d throw a tent in the car and head to the beach on Thursday after Suzi got home from working the night, hoping to find a walk in campsite.

So we did but we weren’t finding anything. Headed south, Suzi told me to turn right, she’d seen a campground sign. It didn’t look promising, but we pulled in to take a look. They had one site available from a cancelation just minutes before. As we were pondering, someone else called to see if there were any sites available. We heard the host discussing all the campgrounds that were full with the caller and decided it was either this place or our back yard. We took it.

We drove home to pack the rest of our stuff and then back again in time to see the setting sun.

Hobby Lobby Minefields

Personally, I’m thrilled with Hobby Lobby. If I1 can’t be forced to fund2 something incompatible with my “sincerely held religious beliefs,” then I don’t have to fund war and killing.3 Major decreases in my tax bill, baby!

;-)


  1. We don’t give corporations more religious liberty than real persons, right? Right?? 
  2. Even indirectly, through third parties, or in the aggregate. 
  3. Justice Ginsburg is my inspiration in this, “The court, I fear, has ventured into a minefield.” Thanks to the Hobby Lobby decision, I don’t have to fund any more landmines.” 

Dear Motorist

dearmotorist

While biking to work this morning, a white pickup truck nearly ran me over. It would have been his1 fault and done while he was breaking the law.2 Fortunately I saw it (him) coming3 and was able to avoid the collision.

I considered a chase,4 but know road rage never goes well for anyone. Instead, I noted the truck pulled into a parking lot near where I work. I wrote a short letter, printed and signed it,5 then walked and stuck it under the truck’s wiper blade.

July 1, 2014

Dear motorist,

Your life almost got a lot more complex this morning. Mine could have ended.

When you turned left from 48th Avenue onto Cornell you were in the left turn lane. There was a car to the right of you, which is a lane that can either turn left or go straight. I was behind that car on my bike.

The car in front of me went straight. Maybe that confused you into thinking that yours was the only lane that turned. Maybe you knew both lanes could turn left but only saw the car beside you go straight so you thought you had a clear path. You knew you wanted to turn right on Elam Young Parkway and had limited distance to merge right. So you did it in the intersection.

In either case, it’s clear that you didn’t see me, on a bike, turning left, next to you. Only because I braked and veered6 did you not run over me.

Please be more careful next time.

Sincerely,

I hope this makes the motorist think,7 and maybe, just maybe, be a little more careful next time.


  1. Her? I never saw the driver. 
  2. ORS 811.340 
  3. It’s amazing how many stupid driver tricks I’ve been able to predict or detect and avoid. I guess it’s true: the one that gets you is the one you don’t see. 
  4. Adrenaline is an amazing performance enhancing drug. 
  5. Yes, there was a real human being on that bike. Not some anonymous nobody. 
  6. I’ve replayed this incident over and over in my head, trying to remember exactly what happened. It’s still fuzzy, and I’m unlikely to make it more clear. My normal route is from the middle lane (the rightmost lane that turns left) across the intersection and ending up in the bike lane exiting the intersection. It’s normally a fun intersection on the bike because Cornell’s banking makes this route downhill. I don’t know how much I had to veer to avoid a collision, but that doesn’t mean it didn’t happen. For example, a couple of weekends driving up the Gorge, a vehicle driving next to us drifted into our lane. Next thing I knew, we were moving left, automatically and without thought. The brain is crazy cool that way. This morning I remember looking left and seeing the truck really close. This was confusing as normally there’s nearly a full lane of blank space between me and the car to the left as I turn. Veer, dodge, just luck? I don’t know… 
  7. And I hope this blog post makes you think. Let’s be careful out there