Jamison’s 6th Grade Engineering Project — More Questions

A little more than four years ago, when Jamison was in sixth grade, he did an engineering project for his school’s science fair. It was a lot of fun for both of us.

Being the proud dad that I am, I wrote a series of blog posts on Jamison’s project as he was doing it. They have been some of my more popular posts and the subject of a few comments and many emails asking for help.

The first questions came from three 8th graders asked for help in the comments to the project’s first post. I did my best to help them and steer them away from danger.

More questions continued to come by email from college engineering students, many apparently hoping to score a quick senior project. One particularly excited individual described himself, “im really glad to see u in ur forum nd im doin btech 2nd year frm india..!!” He also asked for the information to “send me links which r accurate standard pdf…to make it as theory…!!!”1 I pointed out the information he was requesting had already been provided.

This morning, I received another email:

coils

Dear Logan,

I saw the interesting and simply designed wireless powering project it have been done in your website.

I am a PhD student, a part of my project is wireless power transfer.

I am wondering if you can send me the schematic of the wireless project.

I send you the attachment to know which project I mean.

I appreciate your help

Thanks

Regards

Nabeel last name2
prestigious university
country

I think this is the first PhD student asking for help—at least, he’s the first to admit it. Jamison should be proud that his 6th grade science fair project is helping graduate students worldwide. My response (with all snark hopefully removed):

Dear Nabeel,

Thanks for your interest in my sixth-grade son’s science fair project. I’m sure he’ll be proud to learn that a doctoral student would like further information on it.

Jamison followed the instructions documented in an Instructable: Low-Power Wireless Charging.3 There’s a lot of really good information in the Instructable, including a theory of operation section and schematics of the various modules. You should be able to find everything you need to duplicate Jamison’s project. After all, it was Jamison’s primary source of information.

Best of luck with your project. I know Jamison had fun doing it!

-Brent


  1. If only he’d gone to the Instructable Jamison used, he could have downloaded it as “accurate standard pdf,” and it includes a theory of operation section
  2. Almost all personally identifiable information redacted. But the requester emailed using his university email address and has a Facebook profile describing hims education as “Doctorate at [prestigious university] and stating his opinion that The Spice Girls are the greatest British band of all times. 
  3. This fact was mentioned in the fourth post of the series, Wireless Power Transmission, Part IV. I have added a footer to each post in the series to make this fact more obvious to future knowledge seekers. 

Thank You From The American Red Cross

I received the following in my inbox today:

tim

Dear Brent:

Thank you for giving blood with the American Red Cross on 5/30/2014. After first ensuring that local needs were met, your blood donation was sent to Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center in Winston Salem, NC to help a patient in need. Your donation is on its way to changing lives!

Every day, patients like Tim receive blood for a variety of conditions including life-threatening illnesses, blood disorders and traumas. Your blood donations are critical to helping save patients’ lives.

You may be able to help more patients with fewer appointments by donating double red cells. Ask if you’re eligible to give a double red cell donation when you make your next appointment.

On behalf of the hospitals and patients we serve, thank you for being a Red Cross blood donor.

Sincerely,

richardsig2
Richard Benjamin, M.D., Ph.D.
Chief Medical Officer
American Red Cross

I would have given without the thanks (and have many times in the past). Regardless, it feels nice to be thanked, and is interesting to know where at least some of my blood went. I might just try the double red donation sometime in the future.

And yes, the email’s link was red. :-)

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Multnomah Falls Stop

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We’re headed to a wedding in Walla Walla. Ashley and Kevin are riding with us. Road trip!

Kevin had never been to Multnomah Falls before. And I was curious to see the bridge now that it’s been fixed and reopened.

So we took a quick stop and walked up to the bridge. Ashley pulled out her camera and took a selfie of the four of us.

Multnomah Falls achievement unlocked.

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230 kV

IMG_6997-001

Yesterday during lunch, I stopped at the BPA Keeler Substation to take some pictures of the transmission line tower on its front lawn. I used my cell phone’s camera because that’s all I had with me. Surprise — Transmission towers are huge! I couldn’t get enough of the tower in view.

I returned today with my Canon S100 point and shoot with its 24mm (equivalent) lens. Much better! :-)

When the sky is cloudless, I’ll try this again.