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Truth may not be popular, but don’t confuse being unpopular with having the truth.

Biking Recap for June 2014

june2014

It’s the end of the month and time for me to recap how far I’ve biked this month and any major accomplishments. Sorry, but this was a fairly boring month on the bike. A little midday rain stopped me from riding as much during lunch,1 yet I didn’t get rained on during commuting, just a little heavy misting on a couple of mornings.

My June Bicycling Accomplishments

Mileage Summary

miles biked june 2014
Distance Time / Bike
306 Biked in June2
1,369 Biked in 20143
3,366 Biked on Sage4

How is your 2014 so far on the bike?

Keep pedaling!


  1. I don’t like having wet feet at work and don’t have dedicated cycling shoes. 
  2. 3,291 – 2,985 
  3. 3,291 – 1,922 
  4. 2,985 + 75 

Thanks to my friend Bethani, I just started learning Spanish on Duolingo. So far, I’m on a four-day streak. Why, you might ask? As I answered on Facebook:

It’s only a five minute commitment each day,1 and you can learn useful phrases like, “I am not a girl” and “I drink wine.” Those are useful additions to phrases I already know, like, “I do not speak Spanish” and “I like a beer, please.” Besides, research is showing that learning a second language keeps the brain sharp, may prevent/delay Alzheimer’s, and makes you irresistible. Well, I made up that last one, but I’m sure it’s true. Just ask mi novia, Suzi. ;-)

I’m using both my smartphone and computer for the course. My phone is more convenient, but my computer doesn’t have autocorrect, so it forces me to learn the spellings.


  1. But I’m doing more… 

Jamison’s 6th Grade Engineering Project — More Questions

A little more than four years ago, when Jamison was in sixth grade, he did an engineering project for his school’s science fair. It was a lot of fun for both of us.

Being the proud dad that I am, I wrote a series of blog posts on Jamison’s project as he was doing it. They have been some of my more popular posts and the subject of a few comments and many emails asking for help.

The first questions came from three 8th graders asked for help in the comments to the project’s first post. I did my best to help them and steer them away from danger.

More questions continued to come by email from college engineering students, many apparently hoping to score a quick senior project. One particularly excited individual described himself, “im really glad to see u in ur forum nd im doin btech 2nd year frm india..!!” He also asked for the information to “send me links which r accurate standard pdf…to make it as theory…!!!”1 I pointed out the information he was requesting had already been provided.

This morning, I received another email:

coils

Dear Logan,

I saw the interesting and simply designed wireless powering project it have been done in your website.

I am a PhD student, a part of my project is wireless power transfer.

I am wondering if you can send me the schematic of the wireless project.

I send you the attachment to know which project I mean.

I appreciate your help

Thanks

Regards

Nabeel last name2
prestigious university
country

I think this is the first PhD student asking for help—at least, he’s the first to admit it. Jamison should be proud that his 6th grade science fair project is helping graduate students worldwide. My response (with all snark hopefully removed):

Dear Nabeel,

Thanks for your interest in my sixth-grade son’s science fair project. I’m sure he’ll be proud to learn that a doctoral student would like further information on it.

Jamison followed the instructions documented in an Instructable: Low-Power Wireless Charging.3 There’s a lot of really good information in the Instructable, including a theory of operation section and schematics of the various modules. You should be able to find everything you need to duplicate Jamison’s project. After all, it was Jamison’s primary source of information.

Best of luck with your project. I know Jamison had fun doing it!

-Brent


  1. If only he’d gone to the Instructable Jamison used, he could have downloaded it as “accurate standard pdf,” and it includes a theory of operation section
  2. Almost all personally identifiable information redacted. But the requester emailed using his university email address and has a Facebook profile describing hims education as “Doctorate at [prestigious university] and stating his opinion that The Spice Girls are the greatest British band of all times. 
  3. This fact was mentioned in the fourth post of the series, Wireless Power Transmission, Part IV. I have added a footer to each post in the series to make this fact more obvious to future knowledge seekers. 

Thank You From The American Red Cross

I received the following in my inbox today:

tim

Dear Brent:

Thank you for giving blood with the American Red Cross on 5/30/2014. After first ensuring that local needs were met, your blood donation was sent to Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center in Winston Salem, NC to help a patient in need. Your donation is on its way to changing lives!

Every day, patients like Tim receive blood for a variety of conditions including life-threatening illnesses, blood disorders and traumas. Your blood donations are critical to helping save patients’ lives.

You may be able to help more patients with fewer appointments by donating double red cells. Ask if you’re eligible to give a double red cell donation when you make your next appointment.

On behalf of the hospitals and patients we serve, thank you for being a Red Cross blood donor.

Sincerely,

richardsig2
Richard Benjamin, M.D., Ph.D.
Chief Medical Officer
American Red Cross

I would have given without the thanks (and have many times in the past). Regardless, it feels nice to be thanked, and is interesting to know where at least some of my blood went. I might just try the double red donation sometime in the future.

And yes, the email’s link was red. :-)